advanced search
To search within this site simply put in the model name,chassis number etc 

 

Riley Patents 3  1930-1939

1901-1919      1920 - 1930       1930--1938

For a small company Riley seems to have spent its time patenting new designs after many were simply copied and probably after being ripped off by Kirkwoods over the bicycles. Apologies for really anorak/nerd stuff  but it actually shows the designs were a family effort NOT just Percy and  that Allan and Victor actually had a higher profile than Styles credits. Much of this data is really for museum cars but may be useful and as Google Patents is a subsection of books it made sense to use it. Drawings included for those rebuilding something from the earlier days of motoring

**All entries are precis of the full patent which may stretch to many pages and numb the mind. I have included the precis plus the drawings and a link to the archived article. For the complete drawings when following the link to Espacenet press drawings or for the full paper work select original document etc. These amplify the positions of the various sons within the company reflecting a true family business**


**The exploded drawings are stunning for any restoration and form part of the manuals we never got**



1930 GB354424 Allan Riley  May 22, 1930  Widdrington Road, Coventry.     Bonnets for motor-vehicles

Motor vehicle bonnets. , Nos. 15743 and 29373. [Class 79 (iii).] In motor-vehicle bonnets of the kind comprising a transversely hinged top part and independent side panels, the top part is adapted in its lowered position to overlap and rest upon the upper edges of the side panels. In the forms shown the bonnet top [2] and side panels [3] extend in an unbroken line from the rear of the radiator to the wind screen, the top being hinged substantially in the plane of the wind screen, as described in Specification 306,730, [Class 79] (iii), Motor vehicles, Arrangement &c. of parts of]. In the arrangement shown in Figs. 1 and 2, tie bars [6] diverge from a bracket [5] on the rear of the radiator to the ends [7] of a tool box [8] mounted on a support [9], shorter tie bars [13] connecting the rear of the tool box to the door pillars [14]. To the side panels [3], are riveted or welded channelled strengthening members [17] the lower extended ends [18] of which carry pivot pins [20], preferably rubber-covered, adapted to be seated in U-shaped sockets [21] adjustably attached to the chassis frame [23]. Lever-operated catches [24], one seated in the upper end of the forward channelled member [17], the other carried by a plate [24a] spotwelded to the panel, secure the panel in position by snapping into engagement with an apertured bracket [15], [16] attached to the side of the radiator and with the rear tie bar [13], respectively, the receiving parts preferably being rubber covered. A rubber strip [25] seated in the rear member [17] engages the side of the tool-box and its support [9.] The longitudinal edges of the top part [2] are provided with rubber-lined channels [26], which engage the top edges of the side panels. The lower edge of a rear transverse member extending across the interior of the part [2] carries a rubber strip which bears upon the top of the tool-box when the bonnet top is closed. A key-operated catch [12] at the front end of the top engages a member [10] on the radiator bracket [5] to secure the bonnet when closed. The catches [24] may engage longitudinal tie bars extending directly from the radiator to the dashboard &c., where these are provided. In the modification shown in Fig.[ 5], the upper edges. of the side panels are curled as at [29] to engage rubber &c. covered tie bars [31], being drawn down thereon by pivoted spring holders [3] passing through lower flanged edges [30]. The edges of the bonnet top [2] are formed with inwardly curved lips [36 resiliently lined, and pressed into engagement with the edges of the side panels when the top part, which may be provided with a handle [40, is forced down to bring the catch into engagement with the holding member on the radiator. Worldwide applications 1930 GB Application GB1574330A events 1930-05-22 Application filed by Allan Riley 1930-05-22 Priority to GB1574330A 1931-08-13 Publication of GB354424A

1930 GB354867 Allan Riley May 22, 1930, Improvements relating to the engine bonnets of motor-vehicles

 Bonnets; radiators. No. 15742. [Class 79 (iii).] The filler-cap for the radiator of a motor vehicle is integral with or carried by the top portion of the bonnet casing so as to be removable therewith. As applied to bonnets comprising a transversely hinged top portion and independent side panels, such as described in Specification 354,424, the fillercap may comprise an integral or attached extension of the top portion [2] of flat formation to engage a packing washer around the top of the filling orifice [4] or it may be dished or flanged to enter the orifice, preferably with a packing washer interposed. In the form shown in Fig. 4, a number of spring tongues [6] are adapted to engage an internal lip [4a]. In Fig. 2, a stopper [10] is rotatable in a flanged ring [9] secured to the bonnet top [2], rotation serving to tighten a pair of substantially semicircular spring bands [12] encircling the neck of the orifice [4] below an external flange [11] thereon. For this purpose, one end [13] of each band is attached to a peg carried by the bonnet part [2], whilst the other end [14] is attached to a peg carried by the stopper. In the form shown in Fig. 5, the obturator comprises a rubber &c. ring [15] expanded to grip the orifice when conical discs [16] are pressed together against the action of a spring [18] by rotation of a cam member [19] carried by a mounting spindle [17] attaching the elements to the bonnet top. A mascot [7] may serve as a handle for such purpose. Means provided for securing the bonnet in closed position, as described in Specification 354,424, may serve to clamp the stopper in position. As applied to bonnets comprising parts hinged about a central longitudinal axis, the filling orifice is offset to one side and is preferably on the rear part of the radiator so as to lie under the usual bonnet flap. Symmetry may be preserved by provision of a second filler orifice or a dummy filler-cap on the other side of the central axis. Worldwide applications 1930 GB Application GB1574230A events 1930-05-22 Application filed by Allan Riley 1930-05-22 Priority to GB1574230A 1931-08-20 Publication of GB354867A

1930  GB356939 Allan Riley   Sept. 6, 1930, Vehicle body construction

No. 26673. [Class 136 (i).] In order to facilitate access to the rear seat of a motor &c. vehicle by extending the door opening to the rear wheel, a portion [2] of the rear mudguard proper is mounted on the door [7] and pivots with respect to the fixed portion [3] during the opening and closing movements of the door. Preferably the division is arranged substantially at the highest point of the mudguard, and the upper edge [4] of the part [2] moves in a recess formed between the forward edge [5] of the part [3] and an angular strip [10] secured to the underside thereof. A flexible cover [19] of rubber-lined leather or like material extending between the body and door serves as a guard for the front portion of the wheel [14] when the door is open and normally lies folded against an apron [20] depending from the chassis [21]. Worldwide applications 1930 GB Application GB2667330A events 1930-09-06 Application filed by Allan Riley 1930-09-06 Priority to GB2667330A 1931-09-17 Publication of GB356939A

1931 GB371981 Allan Riley Feb. 13, 1931, Motor vehicle bonnets ; radiators.

No. 4519. [Class 79 (iii).] The shell or casing which usually surrounds a front radiator on a motor vehicle is replaced by extensions of hinged bonnet members, which may be of stainless metal or chromium plated or otherwise treated to maintain the semblance. As applied to three-piece bonnets, such as described in Specifications 306,730, [Class 79 (iii), Motor vehicles, Arrangement &c. of parts of], and 354,424, wherein the top flap or panel is hinged about its rear transverse edge. Figs. 1 and 3, the top panel [2] is provided with an extension [3] covering the radiator tank [4]. The side panels [11], which are preferably hinged about their lower edges, are extended forwardly to cover the adjacent sides [17] of the radiator, the front edges [18] being beaded or bent to form a vertical facing strip, or to abut against and be secured to the sides of a stone-guard. The radiator filler-cap [12] may lie under the top extension or may project through an aperture therein, with or without a rubber or other cushioning sleeve [15]. The cap may be larger than the aperture so as to serve to secure the panel in position. The forward end of the top panel may be provided with a catch adapted to engage a part [5] on the tank, Fig.l, or with a clip [9], Fig. 3, to engage the usual front transverse bar 8. When other securing means are provided, the edge of the extension may be grooved or otherwise adapted to rest upon the top edge of a stone-guard or shutter system or upon the transverse bar, the height of which may be suitably arranged, or the extension may be provided with spaced arms forked at their lower ends to straddle the bar. Connection may be effected to a central vertical plated &c. strip [6] located in front of the radiator and secured at its lower end to the chassis frame. Alternatively, the top panel may rest on and be secured to a tool locker or other forward extension of the vehicle body, dispensing with any direct connection to the radiator. Clearance or resilient connections may be provided to prevent interaction between the bonnet parts and the radiator. In arrangements wherein the bonnet comprises flaps or panels hinged about a central longitudinal axis, as in Fig. 5, the panels [20] may be formed with plated &c. extensions [22] adapted to meet under a fixed strip [23] which extends from the top to the foot of the radiator, carrying a badge &c. [24] and accommodating the filling projection [13]. Rubber &c. strips may be fitted between the meeting edges of the various extensions. Worldwide applications 1931 GB Application GB454931A events 1931-02-13 Application filed by Allan Riley 1931-02-13 Priority to GB454931A 1932-05-05 Publication of GB371981A


GB375041 Allan Riley   . May 22, 1931, Improvements relating to the pedals and like control members of motor vehicles Motor vehicle pedals.

 No. 15146. [Class 79 (v) and 136 (ii).] In a motor vehicle with a pedal movable endwise through a hole in the floor and provided with flexible means for closing the hole and preventing entry of draught or fumes, the flexible closing member consists of an extensible or collapsable annular member arranged around the pedal stem and attached both to the pedal stem and to the floor adjacent to the hole. In the form shown in Fig. 1, the inner end of an extensible and collapsable rubber, leather, &c. sleeve [7] has a beaded edge [9] adapted to snap into a groove [8] on the pedal stem [2], and the outer end of the sleeve [7] is passed through a hole [4] in the floor and secured to a flanged metal plate [5] by means of a rubber ring [10. In another form, Fig. 2, the sleeve [7] is built up from a number of annular discs joined together in pairs as shown. A number of other modifications are described. Worldwide applications 1931 GB Application GB1514631A events 1931-05-22 Application filed by Allan Riley 1931-05-22 Priority to GB1514631A 1932-06-23 Publication of GB375041A

GB375591 Allan Riley  July 31, 1931 Improvements relating to motor vehicle bodies Securing mats &c. to floors.
Improvements relating to motor vehicle bodies Securing mats &c. to floors. , No. 21881. [Class 142 (iv).] In closed bodies of motor vehicles that part of the body which is adjacent to the engine compartment is provided with a covering which has a draught-proof engagement with the body or floor boards around its edges and also with the pedals, steering column, &c. Fig. 1 shows a body in which a covering ] of indiarubber, leather, &c. is secured to the rear edge of the shelf [4] and covers the vertical wall [3], ramp [2] and floor [6] together with the side walls [7]. Fig. 7 shows a vehicle in which the cover [26] extends up to a board [30] and seals the edges by means of beading [27], held in grooves [28] by rods [29]. A divided plate 31 is provided for the board [30] and by means of its flanges presses down on to the cover[ 26] to seal the floor. In another form the cover [26] may be provided at its edges and at apertures therein with beadings [37] adapted to be pressed into channels [39] arranged in grooves [40] in the floor and sides.Worldwide applications 1931 GB Application GB2188131A events 1931-07-31 Application filed by Allan Riley 1931-07-31 Priority to GB2188131A 1932-06-30 Publication of GB375591A

GB376535   Percy Riley   Aug. 27, 1931  Change-speed gear mechanism

Change - speed gearing. RILEY, P.,  Now from Riley Engine Co., Aldbourne Road, Coventry. , No. 24103. [Class 80 (ii).] Change-speed gearing with aligned driving and driven shafts [1], [3] and a layshaft [13] comprises an outer key [6] upon an inner key or dog 5 fast on the shaft [3]. Where straight spur gearing is used, both keys are straight, but the invention is described in an arrangement with single-helical gears in which the key [6] is helical to balance the end thrusts on a sliding helical gear [8] or double gear [8], [16. The gear [8] transmitting power through the key [6] slides over a double-ended clutch sleeve [2], which engages the key [5 by means of a slot [4]. When the sleeve [2] is slid to the left, the shaft [3] is driven directly through a clutch 10, the sleeve [2], and the keys [5]. Movement of the sleeve [2] to the right clutches at [14] a loose gear [12<1>] to the shaft [ 3], so that the drive is through a train [11], [11<1>], [12], [121]. The end thrusts on the layshaft [13] are opposed and balance. With the sleeve [2] in mid position, other two speeds are effected by sliding the double gear [8], [16] to left and right into mesh with gears [17], [15] on the layshaft. The end thrusts on the double gear, and on the lay shaft are again substantially balanced. For reversed driving, a helical gear [18] on the layshaft drives a helical gear [19] fast on a reversing shaft [20], Fig. 3, which carries helical splines [21] on which a helical pinion [22] is slidable into mesh with the gear [8]. The end thrusts on the layshaft [13] are opposed and so are those on the pinion [22], but the end thrusts on the shaft [20] are not opposed. Specification 257,413, [Class 80 (ii), Gearing, Variable-speed &c.], is referred to. 1931 GB 1932 FR Application GB2410331A events 1931-08-27 Application filed by Percy Riley 1931-08-27 Priority to GB732659X 1931-08-27 Priority to GB2410331A 1932-02-25 Priority claimed from DER84174D 1932-07-14 Publication of GB376535A

 GB382362  Allan Riley & Harry Rush Sept. 2, 1931Locks for hinged doors of vehicles

. Door fastenings ; holders and stops. RILEY, A. and RUSH, H., Aldbourne Works, Widdrington Road, Coventry.  No. 24643. [Classes 44 and 65 (i).] A safety-catch for a motor-car door consists of a bolt [5] which engages with a single tooth or one of a series of teeth [9] on the running board. The bolt may be withdrawn by the same handle as the ordinary door latch. A positive catch [3], Fig. 3, may be used to hold the door in a partly open position. Worldwide applications 1931 GB Application GB2464331A events 1931-09-02 Application filed by Allan Riley, Harry Rush 1931-09-02 Priority to GB2464331A 1932-10-27 Publication of GB382362A

GB384631   Allan Riley & Harry Rush  Sept. 2, 1931 Locks for hinged doors of vehicles

]Stays. RILEY, A. and RUSH, H., Aldbourne Works, Widdrington Road, Coventry. , No. 27525/32. Divided on 382,362. [Class 65 (i).] A door strap or equivalent stop for a motor car door is arranged to act also as a safety catch. A flexible metal strip [10], Fig. 2, is mounted on the door post [11] and carries a tooth [14] which co-operates with ratchet teeth [15] on a spring-pressed pivoted member [12]. When the door is being closed, the tooth [14] rides freely over the rack [15] but to open the door the member [12] is pressed down by a sliding rod 5 operated by the door handle and engaging an inclined surface [21] on the member [12]. Flanges [20 on the casing [19] co-operate with the tooth [14] to limit the fully-open position of the door. Fig. 8 shows a bolt [36] mounted on the floor or other part of the car and engaging with a notched stay [35] on the door and operated by a cable [30.] A cross-pin [37] engages with the bolt casing [38] to limit the fully-open position of the door. In another form, Fig. 3, a pair of cams [27] co-operates with the faces of an enlarged part [26] of a flexible strap [22], which may be of rubber with a metal insert. By rocking one or both of the cams by means of a cable or rod connected to the door handle the strap is released and the door may be opened. The cams may be arranged to act on the edge of the strap. An enlarged part [23] of the strap co-operates with the end [24 of the strap guide [25, to limit the fully-open position of the door. In place of cams, an intermediate stop [34], Fig. 6, operable by the door handle, may be provided. Worldwide applications 1931 GB Application GB2752532A events 1931-09-02 Application filed by Allan Riley, Harry Rush 1931-09-02 Priority to GB2752532A 1932-12-08 Publication of GB384631A


GB391387   Percy Riley  Nov. 21, 1932 Suspension means for motor-vehicle engines or gear-boxes

Mounting motors &c. RILEY, P., Riley Engine Co., Aldbourne Road, Coventry. , No. 32795. '[Class 79 (iii).] A resilient suspension for a motor vehicle - engine or gear-box comprises a bar [12] longitudinally adjustable in brackets [15] on the frame longitudinals [10], and passing through the crank-case walls [13]. The contact between the walls [13] and the bar [12] is made through soft rubber rings [19], and a part-spherical hard rubber &c. collar [24] forms a rocking bearing between the bar [12] and a sleeve [22] rigidly held by upset ends [23] to the walls [13]. The rings [19] are held in 'position by plugs [20] backed by nuts [21], and the collar [24] by a flange [25] fast on the bar [12] and a flange [26] on a spacing sleeve [27] abutting against one of the plugs [20]. The bar [12] is located between two of the connecting rods, and a secondary suspension, consisting of bolts on a cross-bar passing through horizontal lugs with resilient washers above and below, supports the universal joint casing at the rear of the unit. Specification 270,519, [Class 79 (iii), Motor vehicles, Arrangement &c. of parts of], is referred to. Worldwide applications 1932 GB Application GB3279532A events 1932-11-21 Application filed by Percy Riley 1932-11-21 Priority to GB3279532A 1933-04-27 Publication of GB391387A

GB391588   Percy Riley  March 23, 1932, Bearings for fluid-pressure engines

Cooling bearings. RILEY, P., Castle Works, Aldbourne Road, Coventry.  No. 8630. [Class 12 (i).] In a water-cooled internal-combustion engine in which the crank shaft 4 is supported by a hollow web [3] extending from the cylinder water-jacket [2], the interior of which is in communication with the web [3], the cooling water is applied all round the bearing. As shown in the Figure, an intermediate crank shaft bearing comprising a split ring [6] having a white metal liner [7] has a snug fit in the circular wall [5] of the web [3]. An oil feed tube [10 passes through the wall [5] and the ring [6] and communicates with a peripheral groove [11] extending a substantial way round the interior of the bearing. Oil passes into the radial duct [12] and thence into ducts [13], [15] to lubricate the crank-pin bearings. The hole in the web [3] is preferably large enough to allow the crank webs to be passed through it. The ring [6] is located angularly by a peg [8] entering a notch [9]. Worldwide applications 1932 GB Application GB863032A events 1932-03-23 Application filed by Percy Riley 1932-03-23 Priority to GB863032A 1933-05-04 Publication of GB391588A

GB392330   Percy Riley  March 23, 1932 Change-speed gear mechanism

Change-speed gearing. RILEY, P., Castle Works, Aldbourne Road, Coventry. , No. 8628. [Class 80 (ii).] Relates to change-speed gearing according to Specification 257,413, [Class 80 (ii), Gearing, Variable-speed &c.], that is, having a double-ended dog-clutch sleeve [2] slidably splined on a driven shaft 3 and adapted to engage alternatively a clutch member [9a] on a driving-shaft [6] or a clutch member [10a] on a loose gear [4] constantly driven through a countershaft, all as modified according to Specification 376,535, that is, having helical gearing throughout. The spline connection [8] between the sleeve [2] and the shaft [3] is helical, as are the teeth of the dog ends [9], [10] of the sleeve, so that the sleeve is balanced with respect to end thrust in both engaged positions. A helical gear [12] for a lower speed is helically splined at [11] on the sleeve [2] so that the gear is likewise in balance when in drive. Worldwide applications 1932 GB Application GB862832A events 1932-03-23 Application filed by Percy Riley 1932-03-23 Priority to GB862832A 1933-05-18 Publication of GB392330A

GB394093   Percy Riley March 23, 1932, Change-speed gear mechanism

Facilitating changing speed. RILEY, P., Castle Works, Aldbourne Road, Coventry.  No. 8629. [Class 80 (ii).] In change-speed gearing suitable for vehicles of the type having sliding toothed members such as gears [32], [33] or dog clutches [34], [35], noiselessness in the change is effected by auxiliary ratio gearing on two dummy shafts [2], [5] controlled by fluid-pressure means. The gearing shown is as described in Specification 376,535 and the dummy shafts [2], [5] are extensions of the driven shaft [3] and of the counter-shaft [ 6] respectively. The auxiliary gearing comprises pairs of loose constant-mesh gears [7] .. [10] which are entrained by being thrust by pressure oil against collars [11] fast on the shafts. A source of pressure oil [38] is cut off from supply by a master valve (not shown), except when the engine clutch is disengaged. To put in first gear, a control selector lever [15] moves a selector bar [21] to the right. This first brings a port [37] to connect a port [23] to pressure oil which is delivered to two pipes [41], [42]. The gears on the shaft [2] of the two pairs [7], [9] are both clutched to the shaft [2], while the other gear of the pair [7] on the shaft [5] is clutched to that shaft. The pair [7] is therefore operative to bring the teeth of the transmission gears [32] to proper speed for engagement. Lost motion at [22] between the rod [21] and a slider [20] carrying a fork [17] is thus taken up and the gears are enmeshed. Continued movement of the rod [21] brings an exhaust groove [44] over the port [23] so as to disconnect the auxiliary drive. Tappets [31] on the back of the rod [21 through a rocking lever [28] lock and unlock the slider [20] as required. Movement of the rod [21] to the left for second speed connects to oil a port [24] and pipes [46], [47]. To the shaft [5] are clutched the two gears thereon of the pairs [8], [9] and to the shaft [2] are clutched two gears of the pairs [8], [10], so that the pair 8 is operative to time the transmission gears [33, while a groove [50] disconnects the auxiliary train on completion of the stroke. On sliding another selector rod (not shown), to the right for third speed, oil passes from a port [25] to pipes [41], [47] to render operative the auxiliary pair [9. Sliding to the left for direct drive connects to oil a port [26] and pipes [46], [49] to render operative the pair [10] which corresponds in ratio to a transmission constantmesh pair 36. Specification 257,413, [Class 80 (ii), Gearing, Variable-speed &c.], and 392,330 are referred to in the Provisional SpecificatioWorldwide applications 1932 GB Application GB862932A events 1932-03-23 Application filed by Percy Riley 1932-03-23 Priority to GB862932A 1933-06-22 Publication of GB394093A


GB394652  Riley (Coventry) Ltd & Victor Riey  Dec. 17, 1931, Locking devices for motor vehicles

Locking gear-control levers. RILEY (COVENTRY), Ltd. and RILEY, V., Durbar Avenue, Coventry.  No. 34957. [Class 79 (iii).] To prevent a low gear being brought into operation, so that a motor vehicle cannot be started, the gear control lever is retained in neutral adjacent to the reverse gear position by means of a pivoted member [7] inconspicuously arranged in an opening in the side below the surface of the " gate " support [3], a spring-pressed catch [10] engaging a ridge [14] on the member [ 7] to lock it in action. The catch [10] is housed in a casing [11] under the control of a key-operated lock [15], the casing being secured by screws or bolts to the side of the support [3] and carrying the pivot pin [12] for the member  [7] with a spring [13] thereon to hold the member [7] normally out of action. Worldwide applications 1931 GB Application GB3495731A events 1931-12-17 Application filed by RILEY COVENTRY Ltd 1931-12-17 Priority to GB3495731A 1933-06-19 Publication of GB394652A

GB405429   Percy Riley  Nov. 15, 1932 Fluid-actuated clutches

Clutches. RILEY, P., Castle Works, Aldbourne Road, Coventry. , No. 32276. [Class 80 (ii).] Members [11], [15] are adapted to be clutched together by one or more pistons [20] slidable longitudinally in the member [11] and cooperating with a cam surface on the member [15], the piston or pistons being operated from a source of fluid pressure introduced on the opening of a control valve. As shown, a gear wheel [11] is loosely mounted on a shaft [12] between members [15], [21] secured thereto. There are eight pistons in the member [11] and the cam surface has two crests [16] and two hollows [17]. Pressure oil is supplied, under the control of a main valve, through a duct [23] in the shaft and radial passages [27] to two diametrically-opposed arcuate grooves [24] in the face of the member [21]. When the main valve is opened, oil passes into the two piston chambers [19] which at the moment have their inlet openings [2] in register with the grooves [24]. The corresponding pistons [20] are thus forced against the hollows [17] and frictionally take up the drive. When, during slip, the openings [25] pass out of register with the grooves [24], oil is trapped in the chambers [19] and the pistons engage the rising faces [18] of the cam surface, and a substantially solid drive results. As leakage occurs, further slip is produced and succeeding pistons take up the drive. On release of the oil pressure, spring-loaded valves [29], which control communication between outlets [28] and arcuate grooves [24<1>] on the face of the member [21] and which are normally closed by the oil pressure acting through radial passages [22], open, thus releasing the trapped oil. In a modification, the valves [29] are replaced by spring-loaded balls [30], Fig. 5, adapted to be positively depressed by a flange [32] on a slidable sleeve [ 31]. The clutch may be employed in the gear-boxes of motor-vehicles or as a tail clutch therefor. Worldwide applications 1932 GB Application GB3227632A events 1932-11-15 Application filed by Percy Riley 1932-11-15 Priority to GB3227632A 1934-02-08 Publication of GB405429A

GB422217   Houdaille Hydraulic Suspension Co/AW King/Midland Motor Body Co & R Hallwood. July 28,1933  Windscreen-cleaners

422,217. Windscreen-cleaners. HOUDAILLE HYDRAULIC SUSPENSION CO., Ltd., and KING, A. W., 69, Drayton Gardens, Fulham Road, London, MIDLAND MOTOR BODY CO., Ltd., and HALLWOOD, Improvements in or relating to windscreen wipers Abstract 422,217. Windscreen-cleaners. HOUDAILLE HYDRAULIC SUSPENSION CO., Ltd., and KING, A. W., 69, Drayton Gardens, Fulham Road, London, MIDLAND MOTOR BODY CO., Ltd., and HALLWOOD, R., Aldbourne Works, Coventry. , No. 21294. [Class 138 (i)] A windscreen - cleaner system for vehicles comprises a movable window adapted to swing about a horizontal axis at the top of the windscreen, and more than one wiper arm and a driving motor which are mounted on the bodywork of the vehicle, each arm being adapted to be moved at will by the driver of the vehicle into a position in which it is clear of the screen. In the construction shown in Figs. 1 and 3, a casing [14] housing a motor and transmission mechanism for oscillating a wiper [18], is secured to a cross-member near the scuttle [11]. The member also carries a shaft [16 for a second wiper [17]. A sprocket wheel [25] is fixed to the shaft [19] carrying the wiper [18], and a sprocket wheel [26] is connected through a clutch [27] with the shaft [16]. The shaft [19] is connected through a clutch [28] with the motor and transmission mechanism. The clutches [27], [28] are operated by handles [30], [31], respectively, whereby the wipers may be declutched and turned into positions clear of the screen. The sprocket wheels [25], [26] are engaged by short lengths of chain connected by wire [34], a tension spring being provided to maintain the chain drive taut. In a modification shown in Fig.4, the driving motor is disposed away from the wiper shafts [16], [19], being adapted to drive the shaft [16] by means of pulleys [37,[ [49] and chains [47], [50], connected by flexible wires [51]. The shaft [19] is driven from the shaft [16] by means of pulleys [36], [52], and chains [46], [53], connected by wires [54]. Clutches are provided through which the wipers are operatively connected to the transmission mechanism. As shown in Fig. 6, the wiper [17] is fixed to the shaft [16], to which is also fixed the pulley [36] connected through a chain [46] to the pulley associated with the wiper [ 18]. The pulley [37] for transmitting the drive from the motor is rotatably mounted on a bearing member [39] having a hollow extension [40] surrounding the shaft [16]. A spring [43] acts to press the pulley [36] towards the pulley [37]. The adjacent faces of the pulleys are formed to provide a dog clutch. To disconnect the wiper [17] from the transmission mechanism, the shaft [16] is moved axially to separate the pulleys, and then turned through a right-angle so that the wiper is clear of the screen. According to the Provisional Specification, the motor and transmission mechanism may be mounted on a fixed part of the vehicle above the movable windscreen. Current Assignee ALFRED WALTER KING HOUDAILLE HYDRAULIC SUSPENSION MIDLAND MOTOR BODY Co Ltd REGINALD HALLWOOD Worldwide applications 1933 GB Application GB2129433A events 1933-07-28 Application filed by ALFRED WALTER KING, HOUDAILLE HYDRAULIC SUSPENSION, MIDLAND MOTOR BODY Co Ltd, REGINALD HALLWOOD 1933-07-28 Priority to GB2129433A 1935-01-08 Publication of GB422217A

GB414816A.Allan Riley & Harry Rush March 23, 1933Stud fastenings for doors &c.
, Aldbourne Works, Widdrington Road, Coventry.  No. 8761. [Class 44.] A handle-controlled fastening for the doors of vehicles &c. comprises a pair of movable jaws [11], [12] slidably mounted in a striker plate [13], and adapted to receive a dowel 1[5] having a pair of opposite notches [20] to engage the edges of the jaws. The dowel can be turned by a handle [17] to release it from the jaws. The jaws have lugs [24] which engage stops [26] on the plate [13] and are pressed apart by a spring [25] to force the jaws towards each other. The jaw [12] may slide in an opening in the jaw [11]. A safety catch [21] may coact with a lug [22] on the handle to prevent the handle from being turned.Worldwide applications 1933 GB Application GB876133A events 1933-03-23 Application filed by Allan Riley, Harry Rush 1933-03-23 Priority to GB876133A 1934-08-16 Publication of GB414816A


GB412742   Allan Riley & Harry Rush May 2, 1933 Securing sheet material in position

Securing coverings in position. RILEY, A., and RUSH, H., c/o Midland Motor Body Co., Ltd., Widdrington Road, Coventry. , No. 12745. [Class 142 (iv).] A covering of sheet material for floors or walls such as motor vehicle floors or running boards or side walls, is detachably secured in position by being inserted in a resilient U- shaped fillet 12 which is secured round the edges of a part to be covered, against a substantially rigid backing member 14, such as a flanged metal strip. The gap between the fillet flanges is at some part less than the thickness of the sheet. A rubber fillet may be used, and it may have a tail flange 13, engaged by one flange 15 of the angle strip 14, whereby it is clamped in position. The two jaw parts of the fillet may be serrated. The floor may be covered first with a layer of felt 17 and after the rubber lamination or other covering 18 cut to the shape of the part to be covered has been initially positioned by means of press buttons, &c., the upper edge of the flange 19 is pulled back for insertion of the covering 18. The fillet may be secured in position by wooden bars or by other means described. It may be originally of tubular form and may have a resilient tail flange to lie against a door and make a draught proof seal. Worldwide applications 1933 GB Application GB1274533A events 1933-05-02 Application filed by Allan Riley, Harry Rush 1933-05-02 Priority to GB1274533A 1934-07-05 Publication of GB412742A

GB420433   Percy Riley  May 3, 1933  Suspension means for motor-vehicles

Vehicle suspensions; springs combined with screw mechanism. RILEY, P., c /o Riley Engine Co., Aldbourne Road, Coventry. , Nos. 12894 and 12722. [Classes 108 (ii) and 108 (iii)] In a suspension system for road vehicles a road wheel is mounted on a fixed or pivoted part of a substantially horizontal crank [12] which is rotatable about a transverse horizontal axis and has a screw-threaded or equivalent connection about this axis with a non-rotatable member or nut [20] which is slidably mounted in a supporting casing [17] for the crank for movement against resilient means forming the spring suspension. As shown in Fig. 1, the spindle [13] of the crank is provided with helically arranged keys [19] engaging corresponding slots in the nut [20], forked projections on which engage flanged bushes [22] slidable on bars [23] parallel to the spindle [13]. Rotation of the crank due to upward movement of the road wheel relatively to the frame, causes axial movement of the nut [20] against the compression and torsion of one or more springs [24] acting thereon and, when necessary, against the compression of additional springs [26] coaxial with the bars [23]. A recoil spring [27 is compressed on opposite rotation of the crank. In a modification, the spindle has a quick-thread engagement with the nut while projections on the nut engage grooves in the casing [17]. In another construction, Fig. 5, a second crank [34] is provided beneath the crank [12] and may be connected with its casing [33] similarly to the crank [12] to provide part of the spring suspension or alternatively may act as a shock-absorber. The cranks carry pins [35] supporting a member [36] forming a steering support for the stubaxle [37]. In a modification, the second crank is replaced by a hinged arm serving to take the brake reaction. In a further modification (not shown), the two cranks or the crank and arm support the stub-axle through ball-and-socket means which serve to take both the steering and springing movements. As shown in Fig. 7, the casing [17] is pivotally mounted on an axis [15] for steering purposes, the stub-axle [37] being integral with the crank [12], a lower arm [40] as described above taking the brake reaction. The invention is also shown applied to a driven, steering road wheel. Worldwide applications 1933 GB 1934 DE FR US Application GB1289433A events 1933-05-03 Application filed by Percy Riley 1933-05-03 Priority to GB1289433A 1934-12-03 Publication of GB420433A

GB423454   Percy Riley  Oct. 12, 1933, Transmission and change-speed mechanism

Controlling change speed gearing. RILEY, P., c/o Riley Engine Co., Aldbourne Road, Coventry.  No. 28190. [Class 80 (ii)] Transmission mechanism suitable for motor vehicles comprises a pedal-controlled main friction clutch [12], Fig. 1, and a change-speed gear in two portions A and B, the portion B remote from the clutch being an " easy-change " device connected so as to be actuated mechanically by the clutch pedal [30]. The change-speed gearing shown has three pairs of constant-mesh gears and yields four speeds corresponding to the changes two and two of four clutches, [19], [20], and a coupled pair [23]. In the form shown, the easy-change character is derived from the two clutches [23] being frictional. In a form shown in Fig. 1, of Specification 423,455, the easy change character is derived from a tail or isolating oneway clutch [46]. The clutches [19, [20], Fig. 1, of the portion A are operated in unison by integral forks [41], Fig. 2, sliding on a fixed guide which also supports a fork [40] operating the clutch pair [23]. The forks [41] are connected so as to be shifted completely by moving a hand lever [39] in the plane of Fig. 2. The fork [40] is moved from the pedal [30] after a selector movement of the hand lever [39] in the plane of Fig. 3. The pedal [30] is geared to a pair of opposite cranks [34] connected to slide two bars [35] in opposite directions. When the pedal [30 is in the depressed position of Fig. 2, two notches [36] in the bars [35] are in line. The lever [39] can then be moved in the plane of Fig. 3 to bring a stem [37] into engagement with one or other of the notches [36]. On release of the pedal [30], the stem [37] is carried one way or the other according to which rod [35] is engaged. The fork [40] and clutch pair [23] are thus moved one way or the other on release of the pedal according to the selective setting of the lever [39. Specification 405,429 also is referred to. Worldwide applications 1933 GB Application GB28190/33A events 1933-10-12 Application filed by Percy Riley 1933-10-12 Priority to GB28190/33A 1935-02-01 Publication of GB423454A



GB423455   Percy Riley Oct. 12, 1933,  Change-speed mechanism. .

Controlling change speed gearing. RILEY, P., c/o Riley Engine Co., Aldbourne Road, Coventry. Oct. 12, 1933, No. 28191. [Class 80 (ii)] Transmission mechanism suitable for motor vehicles comprises a preselector control for a change-speed gear having two portions A and B, Fig. 1, in series, one of these portions being an " easy-change " device. The preselection is effected by movements of a hand-lever [24], Fig. 3, in perpendicular directions thereby stressing springs, and the selected changes are effected by depressing and releasing a pedal [35] which may be the main clutch pedal. The change-speed gearing shown in Fig. 1 has three pairs of constant-mesh gears and yields four speeds corresponding to the changes two and two of four dog clutches [11], [12] and a coupled pair [40]. The easy-change character is derived from a tail or isolating one-way clutch [46]. The easy-change character of a form of gearing shown in Fig. 1 of Specification 423,454 is derived from the frictional character of the clutch pair [23]. The clutches [11], [12], Fig. 1, are brought into action by being moved right singly by separate forks [13], [14], Fig. 5. The pair [40] is moved two ways by a single fork [39], Fig. 4. The forks [13], [14] are pressed right of Fig. 3 by separate springs [15] and each fork has an arm [21] and pin [16]. In the neutral position shown, the pins [16] are pressed by the springs [15 into locking notches [18 in a transversely movable selector bar [17] connected through a lever [29], rod [27], two springs [23] and a cylinder [26] to a rectangular arm [25] on the lever [24]. The fork [39 is connected through a stem [3], Fig. 4, and two springs [38] to the heel of the lever [24. The pedal [35] is geared to a pair of opposite cranks [3], Fig. 3, connected to slide two bars [19, [30 in opposite directions. In the released position shown, two notches [36] in the bars [19], [30] are out of line so that the stem [37] cannot be moved into either. To select a speed change, the lever [24] is moved, say, clockwise of both Figs. 3 and 4. The cylinder [26] rises and stresses a spring [23] which tends to depress the selector bar [17]. A spring [38] is stressed which thrusts the stem [37 against the bar [30]. To effect the change, the pedal [35] is depressed and released. The depression causes two shoulders [ 20] on the left-moved bar [19] to lift the pins [16] out of their lock notches [18] so that the selector bar [17] shoots down to bring a slot [22] opposite the upper pin [16]. At the same time, the stem [3]7 slips into the notch [36] in the bar [30]. Release of the pedal causes the pin [16] of the fork [14] to slip into its slot [22] so that that fork is operatively moved by its spring [15] to engage the clutch [12] while the other clutch [1] is held out by the lower pin [16] engaging the face of the selector bar. At the same time, the left moving bar [30] carries the stem [37] and fork [39] with it to clutch the gear [41] to the driven shaft [47]. The selector bar [17] has a lower slot [22] for the pin [16] of the other fork [13]. Worldwide applications 1933 GB Application GB28191/33A events 1933-10-12 Application filed by Percy Riley 1933-10-12 Priority to GB28191/33A 1935-02-01 Publication of GB423455A

GB433896 Allan Riley  & Reginals Hallwood April 26, 1934, Ventilators

Ventilation for vehicles. RILEY, A., and HALLWOOD, R., c/o Midland Motor Body Co., Widdrington Road, Coventry.  No. 12593. [Class 137] A ventilator for use on a motor vehicle and constructed to open either towards or away from the direction of motion, comprises a rocking plate 15 having semi-cylindrical surfaces [16], [16] on its edges resting in gutters [14], [14b] formed in a panel [12]. The plate is held in contact with either bearing surface [14], [14b] by two pairs of springs [18a], [18b] and is moved by rotation of a spindle [22] on which is a nut [21] attached to a bracket [20] extending inwardly from the plate [15]. According to the direction of rotation of the spindle, the plate [15] is raised either at one end or the other against the action of one of the springs the other spring tending to retain one of the surfaces [16], [16] against its bearing surface [14] or [14b]. In a modification, the actuating handle is secured to the plate and is guided by a pin engaged in a V-shaped slot. Worldwide applications 1934 GB Application GB1259334A events 1934-04-26 Application filed by REGINALD HALLWOOD 1934-04-26 Priority to GB1259334A 1935-08-22 Publication of GB433896A

 GB435331 Allan Riley  + Reginald Hallwood   May 4, 1934  Fasteners

. fastenings. RILEY, A., and HALLWOOD, R., c/o Midland Motor Body Co., Widdrington Road, Coventry. May 4, 1934, No. 13505. [Class 44] A catch [15] held on a non-circular portion [17] of a stem [16] by a nut [18] engages under a flange 20 by rotation of the stem in a sleeve mounting 12 secured to the lid, and is tightened to prevent rattle &c. by axial movement of the stem effected by a nut [21] threaded on the outer end of the sleeve [12]. The nut engages a shoulder on the operating knob [19] of the spindle. The spindle is axially biassed to release position by a compression spring [14] housed in a recess in sleeve [12] and bearing against catch [15]. The catch may be locked in fastening position by a revolving barrel [22] housed in the knob 19 and serving, when rotated by key, to shoot a bolt, not shown, into a recess [23] in sleeve [12]. Worldwide applications 1934 GB Application GB1350534A events 1934-05-04 Application filed by REGINALD HALLWOOD 1934-05-04 Priority to GB1350534A 1935-09-19 Publication of GB435331A

GB435497  May 26, 1934 Percy Riley  Transmission and change-speed mechanism

Variable-speed gearing. RILEY, P., Castle Works, Aldbourne Road, Coventry. , No. 15738. [Class 80 (ii)] Relates to gearing having coaxial driving and driven shafts, a layshaft parallel thereto and three constantly-meshed gear pairs of which some of the gears are free, two double-acting clutching systems being provided to give four forward speeds, a clutch of each system being engaged for each speed, one of the systems being arranged beyond the end of the layshaft. According to the invention, the other clutching system is arranged between two of the constantly meshed gears and comprises two dog clutches. Driven, intermediate and driving shafts [12], [14], [16] are coaxial and spigotally connected, a short parallel layshaft being provided at [17]. The layshaft has two fast gears [18], [19]  and a free gear [2], permanently in mesh with a gear [21] fast on the driving shaft. The gear [18] is permanently in mesh with a gear [22] fast on the intermediate shaft [14] and can be locked to the free gear [20] by a dog clutch sleeve [23]. The gear [22] can be clutched to the driving shaft by a dog clutch sleeve [24]. The other fast gear [19] on the layshaft is permanently in mesh with a gear [25] free on the intermediate shaft. This gear is formed with a sleeve [26] carrying fast thereon the hub [27] of a clutch member [28] which carries dog clutch teeth [29]. A similar clutch member [30] is fast on the intermediate shaft [14]. Surrounding these two clutch members is a double-acting clutch member splined at [32 to the driven shaft. This member comprises a sleeve [33] with striking collars [34, grooves 35 to coact with balls [36] to locate the member and flanges [37], [38] bolted together with the interposition of a plain ring [39]. In these flanged portions are sets of dog teeth [40, [41 adapted to engage the teeth [29], [31]. The outer or female clutch members [42], [43] are formed as rings having lugs [44] lying in slots in the flanges [37], [38]. Through each of these lugs passes a bolt [46] having a shoulder [47 engaging a lug of the member [42], a compression spring [48] being interposed between the lug of the'other member [43] and the head [49] of the bolt, the head sliding in a part [50]. First speed is by way of[ 21], [20], [18], [19], [25, [28], [29], [40] and [12], the intermediate shaft [14] rotating idly. For second speed clutch [24] is used and the drive is by way of [21], [24], [22], [18] and then as for first speed. For third speed and direct drive, the dog teeth [31, [41 are engaged, the drives being respectively through dog clutches [23] and [24]. The sleeve [33] is preferably connected with the main clutch and the members [42], [43] are applied by the ring [39] under the pressure of the springs [48]. In a modified form of clutch, the synchronizing friction members are arranged outside the dog tooth members [40], [41]. In each gearchanging operation, the clutch sleeves [23], [24] are engaged, whilst the associated members are isolated from the drive. Specifications 423,454 and 423,455 are referred to. Worldwide applications 1934 GB Application GB1573834A events 1934-05-26 Application filed by Percy Riley 1934-05-26 Priority to GB1573834A 1935-09-23 Publication of GB435497A

GB441925   Percy Riley  June 29, 1934  Transmission and change-speed mechanism

Variable-speed gearing. RILEY, P., c/o Riley Engine Co., Ltd., Aldbourne Road, Coventry.  Nos. 19229 and 22084. [Class 80 (ii)] A variable - speed gear has coaxial driving and driven shafts [14], [15], a parallel layshaft 26], three constant-mesh gear pairs [22], [24]; [18], [27]; [23], [25], of which some of the gears are free ; and two clutching systems [19], [20 to obtain four forward speeds. The clutching systems are arranged on opposite sides of the gear pairs, which are substantially adjacent one another. In the form shown, an intermediate shaft [13 carries the gear [18] and the gears [22], [23] are mounted on loose sleeves [16], [17]. The driving shaft [14] may be connected to the shaft [13] or sleeve [16] by the clutch [19], and the driven shaft [15] to the shaft [13] or sleeve [17] by the clutch [20]. The gear [24] may be connected to the layshaft [26] by an overrunning clutch, or by a toothed clutch [21a], Fig. 2, which is disengaged for certain speeds. Control is effected by a slidable and rotatable rod [43] moved by a lever operating in the usual gate. During speed changing, the clutch [19] is disengaged by depressing the clutch pedal [28], which through a rod [29] tilts a lever [31] which lifts a pair of levers [33a], [33b], which thus lift valves [34a, [34b to the position shown, in which both sides of the clutch-operating piston [38] are connected to exhaust and the presser plate[ 64] is held by the springs [63], [65] in its disengaged position. When the rod [43] is in its intermediate neutral position, the toothed plate [41] prevents both of the valves from falling, but when the control lever is moved fore or aft in the gate, the consequent endwise movement of the rod [43] acts by means of the inclined projection [53] and pins [54 to tilt the plate [41] and permit one of the valves to drop when the pedal [28] is released, thus admitting pressure oil to one side or the other of the piston [38], thus clutching the driving shaft [14] to the sleeve [16] through the clutch plates [67] or to the shaft [13] through the plates [79]. Endwise movement of the rod [43] also rotates through a rack [43c] and pinion [44], a cam [69] engaging a pivoted lever [70] which controls the movements of the clutch [21a]. The rocking of the lever [43] between each gear change causes the arm [43a] to move the pinion up or down as seen in Fig. 4, thus operating a valve [6] through a bell-crank [45] so as to admit pressure oil to one side or other of a piston [51] which controls the clutch [20. Extreme rocking of the rod [43] brings clutch teeth [89] into engagement with a disc [91], which, on the ensuing endwise movement of the lever [43, is rotated to slide the reversing train 92 into engagement with the gears [23], [24]. The clutch [20], and in some cases the clutch [19], is a positive clutch with synchronizing friction means. Specification 435,497 is referred to. Specifications 423,454 and 423,455 also are referred to in the first Provisional Specification. According to the second Provisional Specification, the clutching system [20] may be replaced by a double hydraulic clutch of the kind described in Specification 405,429, a ring with opposed cam faces being secured in a cage fast on the driven shaft and a pair of blocks carrying pistons being splined to the sleeve [17] and intermediate shaft [13]. The supply of oil is controlled by a slide valve [c] connected by a bell-crank to the gear lever so as to be affected only by the lateral movement of the lever. The clutching system [19] is replaced by a piston fixed to the driving shaft and carrying projections by which it drives an axially movable cylinder whose outer faces coact with friction discs carried by the sleeve [16] and shaft [13]. Reverse drive is preferably introduced by means of a sliding gear operated hydraulically. Worldwide applications 1934 GB Application GB1922934A events 1934-06-29 Application filed by Percy Riley 1934-06-29 Priority to GB1922934A 1936-01-29 Publication of GB441925A

GB449077   Percy Riley  Nov. 19, 1934,  Hydraulic-actuating means, for use on a motor-vehicle

Friction clutches; variable-speed gearing. RILEY, P., Castle Works, Aldbourne Road, Coventry. No. 33216. [Class 80 (ii)] [See also Group XXVI] In a motor vehicle, the main clutch, or a clutch or brake by which a gear train is adapted to be brought into operation, is actuated by pressure oil from the engine lubricating system acting on a piston [20] mounted in a cylinder formed concentrically in the engine flywheel [16. A flexible diaphragm [25] has its outer periphery secured to the cylinder and its inner periphery secured to the rod [24] of the piston [20], oil leaking from the cylinder and collecting between the latter and the diaphragm being returned to the engine sump through passages [43], [44] in the flywheel. As shown, a pair of clutches [12] and [13] are adapted to be selectively operated so as to connect either a shaft [14] or a sleeve [15] to the engine shaft [17, a presser plate [32] common to the two clutches being actuated through springs by pins [28] secured to arms [27] connected to the rod [24]. The clutches are arranged in a drum [29] secured to the flywheel. Pressure oil is adapted to bo supplied selectively to one side or the other of the piston [20], so as to cause engagement of the appropriate clutch, through a pair of plunger valves [39] and [40] which control communication between an inlet [55] and passages [37], [38] leading to the two sides of the piston through passages in the shaft bearing [36], the shaft [17], and the piston, the arrangement being such that when one passage [37] or [38] is open to the inlet [55], the other is open to a chamber [49] communicating with the sump. The valves [39], [40] are controlled as described in Specification 441,925. A spring-loaded accumulator or an auxiliary pump may be provided so that the clutches may be operated when the engine is not running. Worldwide applications 1934 GB Application GB33216/34A events 1934-11-19 Application filed by Percy Riley 1934-11-19 Priority to GB33216/34A 1936-06-19 Publication of GB449077A

GB449637   Riley (Coventry) Ltd & Harry Rush May 2, 1935, Brake mechanism 

Locking levers. RILEY (COVENTRY), Ltd., RILEY, S., and RUSH, H., Riley Works, Durbar Avenue, Lockhurst Lane, Coventry.  No. 13082. [Class 80 (iii)] [See also Group XXXIV] A locking device for a brake-operating lever comprises a single pivoted pawl adapted for lateral rocking movement to coact with the staggered teeth of a plurality of ratchets. The hand lever [10] is carried by an arm [17] secured to a sleeve [18] mounted on the pivot [19], the sleeve [18] being coupled to the arm [20]. A pair of stationary ratchets [11], [12] disposed on either side of the arm [17] have staggered teeth which are engaged alternately by a pawl [13] mounted on a pivot [13a] with freedom for lateral movement. The pawl can be disengaged against the action of springs [14] by the rod [15]. Worldwide applications 1935 GB Application GB1308235A events 1935-05-02 Application filed by RILEY COVENTRY Ltd 1935-05-02 Priority to GB1308235A 1936-07-01 Publication of GB449637A


GB450394  Harry Rush & Riley (Coventry) Ltd Jan. 1, 1936, Brake mechanism

Locking levers. RILEY (COVENTRY), Ltd., RILEY, S., and RUSH, H., Riley Works, Durbar Avenue, Lockhurst Lane, Coventry. Jan. 1, 1936, No. 13026. Divided out of 449,637. [Class 80 (iii)] [See also Group XXXIV] A locking device for a brake operating lever comprises a plurality of pawls which extend different amounts to engage in succession with the teeth of a stationary ratchet, the pawls being spring-pressed to engage the teeth and being disengaged by a spring-pressed latch. Two pawls [12], 13] pivoted on the hand lever [9] at [14] extend different amounts to engage a ratchet [11] under the influence of spring plungers [15]. The pawls are disengaged by a push latch [19] spring-pressed at [20] and guided in a stop-pin [22]. The latch [19] and plungers [15] are arranged in cut-away parts of the lever [9]. Worldwide applications 1936 GB Application GB1302636A events 1936-01-01 Application filed by RILEY COVENTRY Ltd 1936-01-01 Priority to GB1302636A 1936-07-16 Publication of GB450394A

GB457633   Riley (Coventry) Ltd March 16, 1936  Improvements relating to metal panels for use in motor-vehicles

Sound insulators. RILEY (COVENTRY), Ltd., and HEWITT, F. T., Durbar Avenue, Lockhurst Lane, Coventry. , No. 7823. [Class 64 (ii)] Drumming of metal panels of motor vehicles, such as a door, is prevented by adhesively securing to the inner face of the panel, a sheet of corrugated paper or cardboard material [12,] forming longitudinal air passages in proximity to the panel. Ingress of air to the passages is prevented by closing the ends as at 1[3]. Two or more layers of material may be used with or without flat sheets of paper or cardboard interposed between or surrounding the corrugated sheets. The sheets may be sprayed with cellulose, painted or waterproofed. Specification 12888/04, [Class 96], is referred to. Worldwide applications 1936 GB Application GB782336A events 1936-03-16 Application filed by FRANK THOMAS HEWITT, RILEY COVENTRY Ltd 1936-03-16 Priority to GB782336A 1936-12-02 Publication of GB457633A

GB459084   Riley (Coventry) Ltd & Stanley Riley Dec. 27, 1935,  Propellor shafts for motor-vehicles

Shafts. RILEY (COVENTRY), Ltd., and RILEY, S., Riley Works, Durbar Avenue, Coventry.  No. 35833. [Class 80 (ii)] In motor vehicle propeller shafts of the kind in which the shaft proper [11] yields under torque and is prevented from bending by a rigid outer tube [12], which rotates with it, the shaft is made circular in cross section and of relatively small diameter for the torque to be transmitted and has a sliding connection at [14] with the tube. A bearing [20] at the other end and an intermediate bearing [22] are provided. The tube may be in sections and the bearing blocks may be located at the ends of the sections. Specification 2818/12, [Class 80 (ii)], is referred to. Worldwide applications 1935 GB Application GB3583335A events 1935-12-27 Application filed by RILEY COVENTRY Ltd 1935-12-27 Priority to GB3583335A 1937-01-01 Publication of GB459084A

GB459905   Stanley Riley & Riley (Coventry) Ltd  Oct. 8, 1935,  Mudguards.

RILEY (COVENTRY), Ltd., RILEY, S., and PLAYER, A. C., Riley Works, Durbar Avenue, Lockhurst Lane, Coventry. No. 27749. [Class 136 (i)]- In a motor vehicle having a substantially vertical, movable, bonnet side panel [15], and a mudguard [11] which extends high up thereon, the mudguard [11] is cut away at [16] adjacent to the panel, and is completed by a laterally-extending wing part [18] integral with or secured to the panel [15], and shaped to conform with the mudguard curves, whereby access to the engine and adjacent parts is facilitated. A movable plate [20] extends from the underside of the mudguard [11] to the adjacent chassis longitudinal [21]. In a modification, the wing part [18], instead of being on the panel [15], is integral with or attached to the movable plate [20]. Rubber &c. packing may be employed to prevent rattle at the joints. Worldwide applications 1935 GB Application GB2774935A events 1935-10-08 Application filed by ARTHUR CLARKE PLAYER, RILEY COVENTRY Ltd 1935-10-08 Priority to GB2774935A 1937-01-18 Publication of GB459905A

GB464712   Jan. 17, 1936,  Percy Riley  Valve-operating mechanism for internal-combustion engines 

Valve gear. RILEY, P. No. 1542. [Class 7 (vi)] Valves [13] are actuated by cam bars [19] connected to slides [17] reciprocated by crank or other rotary means [15], the cam bars being formed with surfaces 20 bearing against adjustable abutments [21], and cam surfaces [22] engaging arms [23] of rockers connected to the valves. A spring [28] arranged between the arms [23] closes the valves. In modifications, double arms [23] engaging cam bars with double cam portions give a positive opening and closing of the valves. The abutments [21] may be as described in Specification 465,006. A single cam shaft may be used to actuate the valves at both sides of the engine. Worldwide applications 1936 GB Application GB154236A events 1936-01-17 Application filed by Percy Riley 1936-01-17 Priority to GB154236A 1937-04-23 Publication of GB464712A

1937 GB465006  Jan. 17, 1936, Percy Riley  Hydraulic clack-adjusting means for use for example with valve operating mechanism

Valve gear. RILEY, P.  No. 1541. [Class 7 (vi)] A hydraulic device for taking up slack or clearance comprises a plunger [17] sliding in a cylinder [16] which is supplied at [20] with hydraulic pressure, such as from the lubricating-pump, the supply being controlled by a valve [19] connected by a lever [25] to the device moving over the abutment, for example a sliding cam bar [12]. A leakage at [21] is controlled by a valve [22], or by a groove [22a] in the valve [19]. A cam surface [27] on the bar [12] actuates a valve [15] through a spring-pressed rocker [14]. Worldwide applications 1936 GB Application GB154136A events 1936-01-17 Application filed by Percy Riley 1936-01-17 Priority to GB154136A 1937-04-29 Publication of GB465006A

GB467640   Allan Riley & R.Hallwood  Dec. 19, 1935Improvements relating to windows and wind-screens for motor-cars

Vehicle bodies. RILEY, A., and HALLWOOD, R.  No. 35200. [Class 108 (i)] [Also in Group X] The body of a closed motor vehicle is provided at the side with pillar [16] extending from the waist of the vehicle to the roof, against which the side door abuts, and spaced from the front windscreen to accommodate a fixed or sliding side window [12], separate from the windscreen. The forward edge of the window may engage in a channel [13] attached to the side of the windscreen, or it may abut against the rear surface of the windscreen. In a modification, for a sliding window, the forward edge of the window is integral with a roof-engaging pillar, a dowel or like member at the top of which engages with the underface of the roof when the window is closed. Worldwide applications 1935 GB Application GB3520035A events 1935-12-19 Application filed by REGINALD HALLWOOD 1935-12-19 Priority to GB3520035A 1937-06-21 Publication of GB467640A

GB468647   Riley (Coventry) Ltd &AWK von der Becke    Feb. 7, 1936,  Liquid-cooled internal-combustion engines

Cylinders. RILEY (COVENTRY), Ltd., and BECKE, A. W. K. VON DER. Feb. 7, 1936, No. 3768. [Class 7 (ii)] A partition [17] extends along the water space of a cylinder head, in which the exhaust and inlet passages [16], [14] are on opposite sides, and cooling water enters at [19] on the exhaust side, and flows round the ends of the partition before it leaves at [20]. The only communication with the water in the cylinder barrel jackets is by ports [22]. The combustion chambers are hemispherical and have sparking-plug sockets [18]. Worldwide applications 1936 GB Application GB376836A events 1936-02-07 Application filed by ADOLF WILLIAM KARL VON DER BEC, RILEY COVENTRY Ltd 1936-02-07 Priority to GB376836A 1937-07-09 Publication of GB468647A

GB471823   Riley (Coventry) Ltd & Stanley Riley March 28, 1936, Vehicle suspensions

Vehicle spring-suspensions; vibration-dampers. RILEY (COVENTRY), Ltd., and RILEY, S. No. 9257. [Classes 108 (ii) and 108 (iii)] A vehicle front suspension in which the road wheel is connected for up- and - down movement about a single transverse axis which is either rearward or preferably forward of the wheel axis, comprises a transverse spring for supporting the chassis from the wheel, the spring being mounted to flex in a plane tangential to the arc of the circle in which the axis moves. At each side of the chassis [14] a trailing arm [11] is pivoted about a single transverse axis [28] arranged above the chassis and in the horizontal plane of the centre [17] of mass of the power unit. The arm [11] has integral therewith a spindle [12] which is journalled in a tube [13], the tubes on either side being rigidly connected by a further tube [16]. A friction damper [31] is arranged between flanges [32], [33] on the arm [11] and tube [13] respectively. The other end of the arm is provided with coaxial eyes [18] in which is journalled a bracket [19] coaxial with the road wheel and having an arm [23] at right angles, to the extremity of which is shackled a transverse spring [24] clamped a t[25] to the frame member [26]. The spring is arranged to flex tangentially to the arc of oscillation of the wheel axis and is constructed to take the brake torque reaction. In place of the transverse spring an arm may be pivoted to the frame and to the arm [23] and resiliently connected to the frame through a helical spring. Fig. 5 shows friction discs [36 splined on the ends of the spindles [12] and pressed together by springs [37]. Worldwide applications 1936 GB Application GB925736A events 1936-03-28 Application filed by RILEY COVENTRY Ltd 1936-03-28 Priority to GB925736A 1937-09-13 Publication of GB471823A

GB471824   Riley (Coventry) Ltd & Stanley Riley  March 28, 1936,   Motor-vehicle suspensions

Vehicle spring-suspensions. RILEY (COVENTRY), Ltd., and RILEY, S. No. 9258. [Class 108 (ii)] A motor vehicle is provided with front and rear spring-suspensions in which the frame is suspended from the front wheels about a pivoted transverse axis which is above the frame and in or near the horizontal plane through the centre of mass of the power unit while the rear end of the frame is also suspended from the rear wheels, connected by a back axle casing, at places in or near the same horizontal plane. The front suspension is that described in Specification 471,823 while the rear suspension comprises longitudinal laminated springs [16] shackled to a bracket [17] on the rear axle [14] and carried by blocks [15] secured to the chassis [11] in such a position that in the unstressed state the spring lies in the same horizontal plane as the transverse axis [18] of the front trailing arms [ 20]. Specification 391,727 also is referred to. Worldwide applications 1936 GB Application GB925836A events 1936-03-28 Application filed by RILEY COVENTRY Ltd 1936-03-28 Priority to GB925836A 1937-09-13 Publication of GB471824A

GB472781  MIDLAND MOTOR BODY CO., Ltd., and HALLWOOD, R. Nov. 16, 1936Slidable seats, particularly for motor-vehicles 
Rectilinear-motion bearings.  No. 31267. [Class 12 (i)] [Also in Group XIV] In a sliding seat, angle-section members [16] fixed to the seat frame [17] have each a horizontal flange [15] slidable within a guide channel [12], balls [24] being mounted in this flange to space it from the base of the channel. The guide channels are secured to the vehicle floor and have one flange [13] inturned to retain the seat. The balls [24] project through flanged holes [25] in the flange [15] and are retained by bridge pieces [26] welded to the flange. Rollers or pins [18 at the forward end of the slidable members engage the inturned portions [13] to prevent vertical play. Horizontal play is resisted by a leaf spring on the channel extending through an opening in the side wall of the channel to engage the vertical flange [16] of the slidable member. A spring-pressed plunger [21] can be engaged with notches [23] in the side wall of the channel to locate the seat in different positions. Specification 472,782, [Group XIV], is referred to. Worldwide applications 1936 GB Application GB3126736A events 1936-11-16 Application filed by MIDLAND MOTOR BODY Co Ltd, REGINALD HALLWOOD 1936-11-16 Priority to GB3126736A 1937-09-30 Publication of GB472781A

GB472782  MIDLAND MOTOR BODY CO., Ltd., and  Reginald HALLWOOD, . Nov. 16, 1936 Slidable seats, particularly for motor-vehicles
Slidable seats. No. 31268. Class 52 (ii)] In slidable seats, particularly for motor vehicles, having an adjustable stop of the kind comprising a slide carrying a spring- pressed lever adapted selectively to coact with holes spaced along a guide [13], the seat carrying a spring-pressed catch [26] to coact with a catch [24] on the stop to hold the seat [11] against the stop, the stop is arranged to fit entirely within the channel section guide; except that a handle portion [19] of the lever [17] may extend outside to facilitate operation. The slide comprises spaced horizontal plates [15], [16] between which is pivoted at [18] the lever [17] biassed by a spring [23] so that its offset portion [20] engages one of a series of holes [21] in the vertical flange [22] of the guide [13]. The lower plate [16] of the slide is bent upwardly to form the catch [24] and has at one side a vertical flange [27] engaging the adjacent flange [28] of the guide to prevent vertical movement. Specification 472,781 is referred to. Worldwide applications 1936 GB Application GB3126836A events 1936-11-16 Application filed by MIDLAND MOTOR BODY Co Ltd, REGINALD HALLWOOD 1936-11-16 Priority to GB3126836A 1937-09-30 Publication of GB472782A Not as in Styles he transposed the numbers

GB 476786  RILEY (COVENTRY), Ltd., and STANLEY  RILEY,  April 1, 1937, Steering mechanism and suspension means for motor-vehicles 
Motor-vehicle - steering-gear. No. 9262. [Class 79 (v)] Steering - mechanism in which each steering swivel mounting [15], [16] is pivotally connected (1) to a single arm [13] movable about a transverse vehicle axis [12] and (2) to a resilient means restricted to rectilinear up-and-down movement,each steering swivel [16] carrying a steering arm [20] the operative end [21] or ]22] of which moves during springing movements in a curve resulting from the combined curved and rectilinear movements of the arms and the resilient means, is characterized in that the end or ends [28] of a steering lever [24] connected by links [26], [27] to the steering arms lies on or near the line [23] joining the centres of circles which approximate to the curved paths traced by the ends of the steering arms, so that springing movements result in said links tracing substantially conical surfaces. In the construction shown the spring suspension is that described in Specification 471,823, [Group XXXII], the resilient means being a transverse laminated spring [19] the ends of which are connected by shackles to arms [18] formed on members [15] pivoted in housings [14] on the arms [13]. The steering swivels [16] are connected by the steering pivots [17] to the members [15]. The curves described by the ends of the arms [20] are plotted, and the positions [21a], [22a] found of the centres of circles which approximate to the curves, the transverse line [23] passing through these centres. Worldwide applications 1937 GB Application GB926237A events 1937-04-01 Application filed by RILEY COVENTRY Ltd 1937-04-01 Priority to GB926237A 1937-12-15 Publication of GB476786A


GB488172A  PERCY RILEY, Jan. 27, 1938, Suspension means for motor-vehicles .

Vehicle spring-suspensions.  No. 2588. [Class 108 (ii)] In a spring-suspension for a motor vehicle of the kind such as is described in Specification 420,433, in which each wheel [11] is carried by a substantially horizontal crank [14] having a screw-threaded or equivalent connection with a non-rotatable member [23] that is slidable axially against resilient means [ 27], the crank [14 is also connected with a torsion spring [28] surrounding the spring [27], so that both springs [27], [28] act together to resist movement of the road wheel. In the construction shown in Fig. 1, the cranks [14] with their shafts [17] are supported at the opposite ends of a transverse casing [20], and the inner ends of the shafts [17] are engaged with a rotatable element [25], which serves both as an abutment for the inner spring [27] and also as the means for stressing the torsion spring [28], the other end of which is held by a stationary sleeve [19]. Preferably an additional torsion spring [30] is coupled to the two abutments [25] so as to function as an anti-roll device. In a modification, Fig. 4, the horizontal cranks [35] are associated with a pair of swinging semiaxles [31] and are journalled in casings [36] for rotation about longitudinal axes. Rotation of the shafts of the cranks [35] is resisted by the spring combination as in the construction of Fig. 1, while the ends of the shafts remote from the cranks are provided with cross-arms [38, the diametrically opposed ends of which are cross-connected by resilient telescopic links [39 forming a stabilizing device. Worldwide applications 1938 GB Application GB258838A events 1938-01-27 Application filed by Percy Riley 1938-01-27 Priority to GB258838A 1938-07-01 Publication of GB488172A


 GB496831  15-09-1937 Percy Riley  Military and like motor vehicles

Priority to GB2503837A 1938-12-07 Publication of GB496831A Military and like motor vehicles . Vehicle spring- suspensions. RILEY, P. Sept. 15, 1937, No. 25038. [Class 108 (ii)] [Also in Group XXXI] In a vehicle having all the wheels steered, driven, and independently sprung, the swinging half-axles [25] are connected to a central frame member [11 by means of spring cylinders [26] of the kind described in Specifications 420,433 and 488,172. The cylinders [26] are secured to the frame by channel or other members [27]. Extending into each cylinder is a spindle acting through screw-and-nut mechanism on compression springs, the spindle having a crank-arm 28 connected to the adjacent half-axle by a bracket [29. Worldwide applications 1937 GB Application GB2503837A events 1937-09-15 Application filed by Percy Riley 1937-09-15 Priority to GB2503837A 1938-12-07 Publication of GB496831A

GB499048  Percy RILEY, Aug. 17, 1937 Restricted differential mechanism
Differential gearing. , No. 22534. [Class 80 (ii)] In a differential gearing comprising coaxial bevel gears [2] which are slidably splined on driven shafts [7] and are intermeshed by two or more bevel pinions [3] mounted on a ring [ 3b] having a splined connection with a carrier or driving element [4], friction clutches constituted by frustum-shaped surfaces [8] on the gears [2] and coacting surfaces [9] on the driving element [4] are provided, together with hydraulic means for automatically separating the gears to effect engagement of the clutches when the difference in speed between one of the driven shafts [7] and the driving element becomes excessive. The hydraulic means preferably comprises a pump in the form of a doubleended piston [11] which is eccentrically mounted on a cam [10] on the right-hand driven shaft and is adapted to reciprocate within a chamber [12] formed in the driving element [4], the ends of the chamber being provided with automatic spring- pressed inlet and outlet valves [13], [15] communicating respectively with a supply passage [14] and with a passage [16] leading into the interior of the gearing. The pressure built up within the gearing is released by leakage through the casing, or through a bleed port in the latter. Worldwide applications 1937 GB Application GB2253437A events 1937-08-17 Application filed by Percy Riley 1937-08-17 Priority to GB2253437A 1939-01-18 Publication of GB499048A
After this date all patents by Harry  Rush  etc are subsumed into Morris Motors Ltd  where the main named designer was Alec Issigonis who was such a charming man  that he would not have credited anyone else  for their design skills . And yes he made my own car as a project for an 80% wooden car in 1945/46 but was still not a friendly person
There is then a wonderful anomaly of Percy designing an armoured car for WW2
GB496831 (A) ― 1938-12-07  Military and like motor vehicles   Applicant  PERCY RILEY      "I, PERCY RILEY, a British Subject, of the Riley Engine Company Limlted, Castle W orks, Aldbourne Road, (oventry, Warwickshire, do hereby declare the 6 nature of this invention to be as follows:This invention relates to military and like motor-vehicles, particularly for carrying machine-guns, searchlights, sound-receiving apparatus, wireless apparatus or the like, such as have road wheels at opposite ends of the chassis which are both driven and steerable and, in addition, independently connected with the chassis-frame for supporting the latter.

My main object is to provide an improved vehicle of this kind which whilst having desirable characteristics from the point of view of speed and control at speed, and whilst being capable of negotiating very rough surfaces, will afford material accessibility both for the engine and for the change-speed mechanism.

According to the invention, there is disposed at one end of the chassis an engine connected to drive a change-speed mechanism, at the other end of the chassis, which is in turn connected to drive two spaced, coaxial worms from which drives are taken, respectively, to two differential mechanisms driving to road wheels, at opposite ends of the chassis, which are independently connected thereto for supporting purposes and are steerable.

In a simple construction according to the invention, the chassis-frame mainly comprises a tubular backbone member secured at its ends to the casings of two differential mechanisms Secured to one of these, on the side remote from the backbone member, is an engine, which is conveniently a four-cylinder unit arranged with its flywheel inwardly (i.e, adjacent the associated differential mechanism), the crankshaft axis being just above the differential mechanism and coaxial with the backbone member The main clutch may be incorporated in the engine unit in a known manner, but it is preferably arranged at the remote end of lPrice 11-l 496, 31 the chassis adjacent or incorporated in a change-speed mechanism, the latter being 55 mounted on that side of the other differential mechanism remote from the backbone member The crankshaft drives to the gear-box, by way of the main clutch, by means of a shaft coaxial with the 60 backbone member Driven from the gear-box is a tubular shaft carrying a worm by which the drive is transmitted to the adjacent differential mechanism.

This tubular shaft is also connected, as 65 by splines, to a tubular sleeve, coaxial with and extending along the main driving shaft, to drive a tubular shaft carrying a worm by which the differential mechanism adjacent the engine can be 70 driven The tubular sleeve and the tubular worm shafts, which may be formed integrally, may be journalled in the backbone member Similarly the driving shaft may be journalled in the 75 tubular sleeve From the differential mechanisms drives are taken to the four road wheels through swinging half-axles.

All the four wheels can be steered.

A preferred method of connecting each 80 of the road wheels with the chassis-frame for supporting the latter includes the use of a longitudinally-disposed cylinder substantially midway between the associated road wheel and the backbone member and 85 extending from the associated swinging half-axle towards the centre of the chassis, and the two cylinders at each end of the chassis are connected with the backbone member by transverse channels 90 or other members These latter may also be interconnected by longitudinal channel or other members parallel to the backbone member Extending into each of the cylinders is a spindle formed with 95 a crank arm at the end adjacent the associated swinging half-axle, which is connected by means of a bracket thereto.

Preferably the connection is to the underside of the swinging half-axle Disposed 100 within the cylinder is a screw-and-nut means operating in both directions against substantial compression springs.

The suspension may, for example, be as disclosed in my prior patent specification 105"
  B60K17/02 - cooperative: B60K17/02 (EP) Application number: GB19370025038 19370915 Priority number(s): GB19370025038 19370915 Abstract of GB496831  Vehicle spring- suspensions. RILEY, P. Sept. 15, 1937, No. 25038. [Class 108 (ii)] [Also in Group XXXI] In a vehicle having all the wheels steered, driven, and independently sprung, the swinging half-axles 25 are connected to a central frame member 11 by means of spring cylinders 26 of the kind described in Specifications 420,433 and 488,172. The cylinders 26 are secured to the frame by channel or other members 27. Extending into each cylinder is a spindle acting through screw-and-nut mechanism on compression springs, the spindle having a crank-arm 28 connected to the adjacent half-axle by a bracket 29.